Trafficking in Persons Report 2016

Publication Year: 2016  / Sources: U.S. Department of State, Office of the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights

Cambodia is a source, transit, and destination country for men, women, and children subjected to forced labor and sex trafficking. Cambodian adults and children migrate to other countries within the region and increasingly to the Middle East for work; many are subjected to forced labor on fishing vessels, in agriculture, in construction, in factories, and in domestic servitude—often through debt bondage—or to sex trafficking.

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Built on Slavery: Debt Bondage and Child Labour in Cambodia’s Brick Factories

Publication Year: 2016  / Sources: Cambodian League for the Promotion and Defense of Human Rights (LICADHO)

The interviews and group discussions covered a range of topics including details of the interviewees’ daily lives and their work; their financial situations and the amount of debt owed by them or their families; how they had come to brick factory work; employment practices; the use of child labour; access to education; and injuries caused by factory machinery.

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Rule of Law Index 2015

Publication Year: 2015  / Sources: World Justice Project (WJP)

The Rule of Law Index 2015 was prepared by The World Justice Project (WJP)’s research team. This research has measured on 8 factors: constraints on government powers, absence of corruption, open government, fundamental rights, order and security, regulatory enforcement, civil justice, and criminal justice. A ninth factor, informal justice, is measured but not included in aggregated scores and rankings. These factors are intended to reflect how people experience rule of law in everyday life. This WJP Rule of Law Index 2015 are derived from more than more than 100,000 household and expert surveys in 102 countries and jurisdictions. The report showed that Cambodia ranked 99 out of 102 countries and dead last in the East Asia and Pacific region.

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Rule of Law Index 2016

Publication Year: 2016  / Sources: World Justice Project (WJP)

The Rule of Law Index 2016 was prepared by The World Justice Project (WJP)’s research team. This research has measured on 9 factors: constraints on government powers, absence of corruption, open government, fundamental rights, order and security, regulatory enforcement, civil justice, and criminal justice. A ninth factor, informal justice, is measured but not included in aggregated scores and rankings. These factors are intended to reflect how people experience rule of law in everyday life. This WJP Rule of Law Index 2016 are derived from more than 110,000 households and 2,700 expert surveys in 113 countries and jurisdictions. The reports showed that Cambodia ranked 112 out of 113 countries and dead last in the East Asia and Pacific region. Of the 15 countries surveyed from the East Asia and Pacific region, Cambodia scored lowest and New Zealand highest, with countries like Mongolia and Malaysia falling somewhere in between. Among all 113 countries rated worldwide, Cambodia came in 112, scoring just below Afghanistan and above only Venezuela, a country experiencing food shortages and frequent violence. Cambodia dropped two points in the ranking since last year’s report.

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Human Rights 2016: Six Months in Review

Publication Year: August 2016  / Sources: LICADHO

This is the Human Rights Report in 2016 within first six months monitored by LICADHO.

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ILO Policy Brief on Youth Employment in Cambodia

Publication Year: 2007  / Sources: International Labor Organization (ILO)

Cambodia has a young population with 39 per cent of the population in 2004 below 15 years of age, down from 43 per cent in 1998. By 2004 the dependency ratio showing the children and elderly as a percentage of the intermediate group was 74 per cent.1 Youth aged 15–24 represented 22 percent of the population that year. Large numbers of young people are entering
the labour force as a result of a baby boom in the 1980s. Measures must be taken to ensure that youth do not add to underemployment in the countryside or lead to higher rates of urban unemployment but instead contribute to growth and development through productive employment.

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2014 Post-UPR National Consultation Outcome Report

Publication Year: 2014  / Sources: Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR)

This Outcome Report summarizes presentations, panel discussions and small group discussions undertaken during the 2014 Post-Universal Periodic Review National Consultation organized by CCHR and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (“OHCHR”) in Cambodia.

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Outcome Report: Workshop for Youth on Electoral Reform

Publication Year: 2014  / Sources: Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR)

This report summarizes the issues raised and recommendations of participants during the Workshop for Youth on Electoral Reform. The objectives of this event was to provide opportunities for youth participants to identify key concerns regarding electoral reform and to develop recommendations, in addition to learning about substantive issues regarding to political participation and electoral reform.

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World Drug Report 2016

Publication Year: 2016  / Sources: UNODC

The World Drug Report 2016, which provides a comprehensive overview of major developments in drug markets, trafficking routes and the health impact of drug use, supports comprehensive, balanced and integrated rights-based approaches. The text highlights the importance of drug abuse prevention and treatment; encourages the development, adoption and implementation of alternative or additional measures with regard to conviction or punishment; and promotes
proportionate national sentencing policies, practices and guidelines for drug-related offences.

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Skin on the Cable: The Illegal Arrest, Arbitrary Detention and Torture of People who use Drugs in Cambodia

Publication Year: 2010  / Sources: Human Rights Watch

“Skin on the Cable”
The Illegal Arrest, Arbitrary Detention and Torture of People Who Use Drugs in Cambodia

Cambodians who use drugs confound the notion that drug dependence is a self-inflicted condition that results from a character disorder or moral failing. When Human Rights Watch talked with these people, they were invariably softly spoken and polite. They talked openly and honestly about difficult childhoods (in many cases still underway) living on the streets, or growing up in refugee camps in Thailand. Often young and poorly educated, they spoke of using drugs for extended periods of time. Despite many hardships in their lives, their voices rarely became bitter except when describing their arrest and detention in government drug detention centers. They did not mince words when describing these places. One former detainee, Kakada, was particularly succinct: “I think this is not a rehab center but a torturing center.

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Submit Resources

If you have any resources related to corruption, governance, access to information or related issues that you would like to publish on this platform, please submit it to library@ticambodia.org.

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